Beachcomber by Rachel Loyacono

written by Madeline Rose

Diego Velázquez, t Rokeby Venus , c. 1647–51. 122cm x 177cm (48in x 49.7in.) | National gallery london

Diego Velázquez, tRokeby Venus, c. 1647–51. 122cm x 177cm (48in x 49.7in.) | National gallery london

"The mirror was often used as a symbol of the vanity of woman. The moralizing, however, was mostly hypocritical. You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her, you put a mirror in her hand and you called the painting Vanity, thus morally condemning the woman whose nakedness you had depicted for your own pleasure. The real function of the mirror was otherwise. It was to make the woman connive in treating herself as, first and foremost, a sight.”

- John Berger, Ways of Seeing⁣

Rachel Loyacono⁣, Beachcomber, 2018⁣, Oil on canvas, 30.5x20in.⁣ $725

Rachel Loyacono⁣, Beachcomber, 2018⁣, Oil on canvas, 30.5x20in.⁣
$725

Caravaggio, narcissus, 1597–1599, Oil on canvas, 110 cm × 92 cm (43 in × 36 in), galleria nazionale d’arte antica

Caravaggio, narcissus, 1597–1599, Oil on canvas, 110 cm × 92 cm (43 in × 36 in), galleria nazionale d’arte antica

Beachcomber by Rachel Loyacono

 
 

A nude woman kneels on a patch of sand as she combs through a beach of rocks and ancient artifacts. Contoured with thick red lines, her pink body and untangled hair exudes a kind of heat you feel from laundry fresh out of the dryer, or a phone left out on a metal surface in the blazing sun. ⁣

With daylight beaming on her back, her breasts and their shadow nearly become center focus of the composition. But this figure’s focus lies elsewhere. In the midst of her beachcombing, she discovers a fragmented glimpse of herself from a broken mirror in the sand. The mirror is sharp, angular, precarious even to her fleshy, unprotected skin. There is both knowledge and hubris in this moment of self-realization, which is inspired by Caravaggio’s Narcissus. But in Rachel Loyacono’s classically modernized version, vanitas is no risk. For it is only through having seen the mirror and herself (vanitas), that this figure can know of its sharp edges, or what lies beyond (veritas). As she leans into her reflection, the figure’s gaze shifts beyond herself, beyond the canvas, and into the realm of a viewer, caught in a moment of red-handed voyeurism. - Madeline Rose

Rachel Loyacono

Beachcomber 2018

Oil on canvas 

20x30.5in.

$725

Millennials Kill Plants Too

FEMAISSANCE ARTWORK

(a solution for guilty owners of dead plants)

if you’re a plant killer, perhaps it’s time to fill your home with greenery that doesn’t die on you, yet supports the livelihood of a local female artist! thriving plant parents, this post is for you too. (we strongly advise against watering the artwork)

 
Monstera Deliciosa by Shelby Little
200.00

S H E L B Y   L I T T L E

“Monstera Deliciosa” 2019

Watercolor, ink + silver leaf

1.25 x 8.75 x 10.75 in. frame

$200

@shelby.little.studio


Jasmine by Maddie Stratton
400.00

Jasmine

Acrylic and latex paint on canvas

8” X 10”

$400

 
 
Woman Falls Head Over Heels for Plant... by Robyn LeRoy-Evans
520.00

Robyn LeRoy-Evans
Woman Falls Head Over Heels for Plant…
2015
Archival pigment print
15” x 19”
$520

...But is Left Wanting by Robyn LeRoy-Evans
360.00

Robyn LeRoy-Evans
...But Is Left Wanting
2015
Archival pigment print
11” x 12”
$360

 
 
 
 
Red Flash Caladium by Shelby Little
200.00

S H E L B Y   L I T T L E

“Red Flash Caladium” 2019

Watercolor, colored pencil + oil paint

1.25 x 8.75 x 10.75 in. frame

$200

@shelby.little.studio


 
 
Blooming Balcony
from 10.00

L Y L A   C L A Y R E

Blooming Balcony 2017

Watercolor on aquaboard

$475 - 16 x 20 in. original

@lylaclayre

This overflowing balcony was painted on location in New Orleans LA historic Faubourg Marigny 

16" x 20" watercolor on archival aquabord 2" deep cradled panel

 
 
Abigail Berger | Dusty Mirror
200.00

Abigail Berger
Dusty Mirror
Archival Pigment Print
11” X 14” with Frame
$200

 

Lea's Picks

Our graphic design intern Léa Grzywacz chose her favorite pieces on our site for your perusal!

Léa is a freelance graphic designer, artist and jeweler based in New Orleans. A final year design student at Loyola University New Orleans, Léa has been a local since 2000 and is proud to participate in the creative culture happening in the city. In Spring 2019, Léa participated in Femaissance: Gemini with her painting, Blue Throne.

 

These Shop Squiggles earrings have been on my wish-list since I first saw them. The colors remind me of what it’s like to catch a pink sunset behind a plant-filled New Orleans landscape.

For all Shop Squiggles, click here!

 
 
 
 

“Lyla Clayre’s Lake Martin Diptych is so effortlessly light and airy. Whenever I look at this painting, the color palette and brushstrokes have a calming effect on me.”

Lyla Clayre: Musings in Watercolor

 
 
 
 

“I love a functional art piece. This shiny green Maison Voyage bench is meant for the outdoors, but could grab attention really in any room. Plus I find it's shape and material intriguing and satisfying to look at.”